Stories

Rando/Porteur For Sale

Here is a frameset we've had in the shop for a bit now, and it's time for us to part ways. It has never been assembled. It is designed for a 650bx42c tire with fenders and cantilever brakes. It has a 54cm c-c top tube (2 degree rising), and 52cm c-c seat tube. 440mm chain stays. 375mm a-c fork. 73 degree seat and head tube angles. Regular size True Temper Verus tubing, however 1.125" threadless steerer tube. 132.5mm rear spacing. 371mm reach, 554mm stack. Wow, that's a lot of numbers! Frame is TIG welded, except the seat stays and dropouts, which are brazed. More to come with descriptions of each photo -

This color was very hard to photography! Black with green splash at BB. Powder coat, not paint.

This color was very hard to photography! Black with green splash at BB. Powder coat, not paint.

Front of seat cluster. Pump peg, hand cut sleeve, and integrated brake routing.

Front of seat cluster. Pump peg, hand cut sleeve, and integrated brake routing.

Seat cluster and seat stay area. Internal brake routing, rack mounts, fender mount, and pump peg. Hand made seat stay caps.

Seat cluster and seat stay area. Internal brake routing, rack mounts, fender mount, and pump peg. Hand made seat stay caps.

Back side of the bottom bracket. Kick stand plate with fender mount. On the backside of the BB you can see the port for the internal wiring. Dimples for chain ring on the outside, and 60mm fenders on the inside. Designed to run 650bx42c tires with 58mm fenders.

Back side of the bottom bracket. Kick stand plate with fender mount. On the backside of the BB you can see the port for the internal wiring. Dimples for chain ring on the outside, and 60mm fenders on the inside. Designed to run 650bx42c tires with 58mm fenders.

Bottom side of BB. Hand cut stainless steel cable guides, and 3rd water bottle mounts.

Bottom side of BB. Hand cut stainless steel cable guides, and 3rd water bottle mounts.

DT shifters, and just above those you can see the port for the wiring. All wiring ports are for the fatter Schmidt style wiring.

DT shifters, and just above those you can see the port for the wiring. All wiring ports are for the fatter Schmidt style wiring.

This is where the wheel goes! Paragon dropouts (as always).

This is where the wheel goes! Paragon dropouts (as always).

And the matching front fork. Also comes with fender/rack mounts, low-rider mounts, internal wiring, etc. 1 1/8" threadless steerer.

And the matching front fork. Also comes with fender/rack mounts, low-rider mounts, internal wiring, etc. 1 1/8" threadless steerer.

So you can get an idea of the curve of the blades. 60mm offset. 

So you can get an idea of the curve of the blades. 60mm offset. 

Fender boss under fork crown.

Fender boss under fork crown.

This is where the wire goes in.

This is where the wire goes in.

This is where the wire comes out.

This is where the wire comes out.

But that's not all...

Comes with pannier rack.

Comes with pannier rack.

Handmade in Los Angeles.

Handmade in Los Angeles.

I would be happy to build a matching front rack for this thing, if buyer chooses. We can build it up for you too, if you wish. Email either jonathan or jared @jeromecycles.com to check it out. 

Couple of City Bikes: a photo dump, part 2

Next up is my wife's bike. I've been promising it forever, and now she finally has it! Sorry Sharon!

I wanted something that Sharon could throw her panniers, rando bag, or basket on. I also wanted her to be able to run any combo of those bags and baskets, so I made some versatile from racks for her. 

Rear pannier rack with fender attachment point. I feel like my right thigh made a pretty good tube bending mandrel!

I *think* Velo Lumino makes the only Made in USA tail light. It looks dang good too. Honjo fenders, of course, because they are the best.

Sharon's seat lug is a little tricky to take photos of, but it's enormous and very pointy. It's one of my favorites, if I do say so myself.

There are worse bikes to jump on!

Seat lug is also hard to photograph and also very pointy. Custom brass pulley peeking through behind it.

Custom dual plate crowns we had laser cut. Custom everything.

Custom front rack with semi-low-rider attachment for panniers. Fits rando bag or dog basket.

Hot dang that's a good looking crown!

Couple of City Bikes: a photo dump, part 1

So I just finished taking photos of two important bikes that I've been putting off for a while. One is for my mom and one for my wife. First up is my mom's. 

The porteur rack was made to perfectly fit a Swift porteur bag. 

Custom machined brass pulley.

Handcut head tube sleeve, and it was awful to do! I usually machine them and then just hand file the details. Doing the whole thing with a hacksaw and files was somethin' else.

Copper Crane bells are probably my favorite to look at. Cork courtesy of Lindeman's.

Handcut seat lug.

Rides: Marshall Canyon

Marshall Canyon is a small trail in La Verne California that links with other trails in the area. It offers wooded forest in the dry southern California landscape. It is about a 20 minute ride from the 210 freeway to the Marshall Canyon Regional Park.

It starts with a handful of small open trails that line the side of the hill. For me, the fun begins when you find the entrance to the section with all the trees. Once you start riding in the treelined trails you may never want to leave.

This trail is a rarity in Los Angeles County, and especially anywhere within a mile of a town. It's a hidden gem tucked away behind the nearby homes and golf course. The whole trail is roughly 4 miles, but it is especially rewarding if you ride the north trail Cobalt Canyon, which is mostly a fire road, and find your way into the trail. It's not listed on Google Maps, but it runs along the tree line into the gully. You can see the trees it in the satellite view of the area, but the trail is tucked inside. It consists of two miles of single track with some rocks, roots, creeks, and lots of fun.

I enjoy this trail by myself from time to time, and sometimes with friends. I recommend it for those who want to ride a mild trail with plenty of spots to relax in the trees not just sit in the hot Southern California sun.

Gear: White Industries Hubs

If you've ever looked close at any bike coming out of our shop, it usually has at least some White Industries components on it. We're building a mountain bike for a client right now that's going to get these awesome XMR disc hubs. Everything White Industries makes is clean and made in California. 

We are working on a line of all road adventure touring bikes and mountain bikes that are all spec'd with these hubs. They the best. 

Bicycles: Jonathan's Everything Bike

One of the first TIG welded bikes with a Jerome Cycles head badge was this green number I did for Jonathan. It was before Jonathan was helping me with the bikes, and it was just a bike for my friend.

Jonathan wanted something that could carry things like a porteur, but that he could also take in the dirt and on basically any sort of ride that came up.

Jonathan is a bit like me in that he wants to use as much Made in USA or California stuff as he can. You can spy a good bit of Paul and White Industries components, all made in California. We made the frame, fork, stem, and front and rear racks in our workshop in Los Angeles.

If it's not made in USA, he at least wants something that's not outsourced. For instance, Microshift drivetrain. Microshift is a Taiwanese company that makes their stuff in Taiwan. It's not an American or European company that's relying on the cheaper labor of other countries to produce their stuff. Same goes with the Brooks saddle. Made in England by an English company.

Jonathan doesn't like to baby his bikes, and I think this is the perfect bike to thrash around on. He has no hesitation taking the bike on terrain that would make gentler people cringe.

This thing is parked in the shop pretty much every weekend. If you're ever in town, swing by and check it out. If you're a shorter person, it's a blast to ride.

Introduction: Two Guys Having a Good Time

Jonathan and I have known each other for upwards of about 16 years now. We started out playing in high school band together, then playing in hardcore bands together, being roommates, and eventually working on bikes together. Here's a little about us and a short tour of the shop.

I started welding bikes in about 2004-2005 for a BMX company while in college. I've been making bikes for myself and others under my own brand for about 4 years now. I do the welding and brazing, and I'd say about half of the machine work.

This is me, Jared Jerome.

This is me, Jared Jerome.

Jonathan had been helping me out by assembling complete bikes and building wheels for framesets that I made. He's become a pretty good wheel builder, and builds most of the wheels going on our frames.

Starting a couple weeks ago Jonathan started learning the basic machining of bicycle frames, and has been helping me out with that. Sometimes it can be a little terrifying, but his hatred of long sleeves and love of safety glasses help to put my mind at ease.

The infamous Jonathan Garcia.

The infamous Jonathan Garcia.

About a year and a half ago we had decided that we wanted our own shop space. We had been sharing a place in Vernon (an industrial area adjacent to downtown Los Angeles) but had grown tired of cleaning diesel soot off of our tools every day. Eventually we found a cheap space in San Pedro (the port community of the City of Los Angeles) that was surprisingly affordable. 

This is basically our machine set-up bench. On the right you can see the original painting for our head badge by my pal, the legendary Brendan Rowe.

This is basically our machine set-up bench. On the right you can see the original painting for our head badge by my pal, the legendary Brendan Rowe.

The past few years have just been about making bikes we want and blowing all of our money on tools. It's a good formula for getting tools, but a bad formula for putting money in the bank.

Hey, I'm not a photographer. Gotta deal with my bad pictures. 

Hey, I'm not a photographer. Gotta deal with my bad pictures. 

Lately we've been talking about the want to make bikes that are more just for our enjoyment. We had been making custom frames up to this point, which has been fun, but we're now in the process of making a range of bikes that are more what we want to ride. We're working on a production step through, mountain bike, all-road touring bike, and an old-meets-new light touring (randonneur style) bike. We obviously work on a budget, and it's only two of us, so only time will tell when we will be able to put them out...but trust me we're working on them.

This is where metal gets cut.

This is where metal gets cut.

So that's it for our first post. You can expect posts about bicycles, tools, food, drinks, bike rides, the great outdoors, and the occasional opinions on shop music. Enjoy!